Videos

Educational/Informational



Using Quasars to Measure the Earth: A History of VLBI

Using Quasars to Measure the Earth: A History of VLBI
06/21/2012
VLBI, or Very Long Baseline Interferometry, is a technique that uses multiple radio telescopes to very precisely measure the Earth's orientation. It was originally invented back in the 1960s to take better pictures of quasars, but scientists soon found out that if you threw the process in reverse, you could measure how the ground beneath the telescopes moves around, how long days really are, and how the Earth wobbles on its axis as it revolves around the sun!



NASA Pinning Down "Here" Better Than Ever
02/23/2012
NASA is helping to lead an international effort to upgrade the four systems that supply crucial location information in pinpointing where "here" is.



Nutation and Precession

Earth Orientation Animations
03/01/2013
When you think of the Earth’s orientation, you’d probably imagine something like a globe, where it always rotates around an axis, called the spin axis, defined by the north and south poles. And while this generally makes sense, in reality, the Earth’s orientation is constantly changing very slightly, and this change can be described in three ways. Learn more about how the Earth's orientation changes by watching these animations.

promotional image for SLR Podcast

Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Pi
03/14/2013
Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Pi? Check out this podcast to learn how SLR is using pi to determine the effective reflective surface area of retroreflectors!

On Target with GPS video

On Target With GPS
12/16/2010
Learn more about GPS and how it works in this video produced by NASA and Air Force Space Command.

Events

Laser at GGAO pointing toward sky

NASA Social Media Day - November 03, 2017
11/03/2017
Scenes from the GGAO tour at GSFC on NASA's Social Media Day

Time-lapse video of VLBI2010 installation at GGAO

Time-lapse video of VLBI2010 Installation at GGAO
08/14/2012
Time lapse video showing the construction of the VLBI2010 antenna at NASA Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory GGAO, September 15 through October 12, 2010.